labels: aerospace, aviation, boeing
Royal Airways'' SpiceJet to operate Boeing 737 800 jetsnews
Our Corporate Bureau
10 February 2005

Mumbai: New Delhi-based Royal Airways Limited, earlier known as Modiluft, has announced the launch of its new low-fares, no-frills, brand, SpiceJet. Modiluft was among the first private companies to enter the private Indian aviation sector and was among the front runners until 1996, when it ceased operations.

The only publicly listed airline company in the country expects to commence operations in May 2005 and hopes to afford air travel to the growing middle class segment with low airfares combined with, what it describes as, world-class standards in safety, efficiency and customer care. This will be achieved on the back of intensive technology and training, says the company.

According to Mark Winders, CEO, "Using the latest technology is the only way to ensure we can provide attractive pricing without compromising on quality. Driving a low cost structure, boosting productivity and delivering value will be our focus," he added.

"Our culture will encourage cost saving, teamwork and friendly service," says Jason Bitter, COO, who emphasises that the airline would develop a high level of human skills through sustained training. Efficiency, he explains, is woven in to the airlines'' management process.

The airline has already selected the 737-800 Jet aircraft and has been in the news for having signed letters of intent to lease its first three aircraft from the Seattle-based Boeing. He aircraft, says the company meets its low-cost focus. ''These aircraft are best equipped to spend more time in the air, and less on the ground - one of the keys to success of a low-cost airline,'' says Roger Page, executive vice president, engineering

Capt J S Dhillon, who heads the company''s flight operations adds that the airline employing highly innovative techniques in flight management, for which, Boeing would be just right.


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Royal Airways'' SpiceJet to operate Boeing 737 800 jets